Kansas – The Nation’s Breadbasket

For years I've seen these signs along the highways in Kansas.  This sign is along Interstate 70.

For years I've seen these signs along the highways in Kansas. I convinced my husband to stop as we were speeding by the third one I'd seen, and I ran through the thick plant growth and took this photograph. This sign is along Interstate 70.

I was born in Virginia, but I’ve spent most of my life in Kansas.   Even though I’ve always lived in cities, I’ve never been far from fields of wheat, soybeans and corn. 

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture , Kansas is the top wheat producer in the United States.  (We’re number one!  We’re number one!)  This year, Kansas farmers harvested an estimated 360.8 million bushels, up from 356 million bushels last year.  Kansas farmers harvested 8.8. million acres this season, about 100,000 fewer acres than a year ago but achieving an average of one more bushel an acre in yield this year. 

Hurrah for the Kansas farmer and for Mother Nature for glorious weather!  Hurrah for farmers everywhere.

This wheat field  is in the city limits of Overland Park, Kansas, the largest city in Kansas, and part of the metropolitan Kansas City area.  It's surrounded by commercial development and is for sale, so eventually, you'll see cars here instead of crops. Too bad. I like seeing farm fields.  Last year, it was planted in soybeans.

This wheat field is in the city limits of Overland Park, Kansas, which is the second-most populous city in Kansas, and part of the metropolitan Kansas City area. It's surrounded by commercial development and is for sale, so eventually, you'll see cars here instead of crops. Too bad. I like seeing farm fields. Last year, it was planted in soybeans.


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1 Comment

Filed under Agriculture, Food, Kansas, Kansas City, Life, Personal

One response to “Kansas – The Nation’s Breadbasket

  1. You have to wonder where we are going to be when we have no farm land left, thanks to commercial development. The thing that gets me about the commercial development is it’s these large houses that are to expensive to buy, and commercial buildings that are all sitting vacant due to the economy. Farming seems so much more important!

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