Tag Archives: Nature

What Does The Fox Say?

After watching this mother fox diligently tend to her young, I think she says “I’m exhausted!”

On and off for many years in the Spring, red foxes have made a den in the rocky ledges of friends’ rural backyard in the Kansas City. This year, there are two adults and six kits. A fox family consists of a male and female adult, plus their offspring, although sometimes a female from the previous litter will help. The gender of the second adult in this family wasn’t clear. The kits (also known as pups or cubs) may be about three weeks old in these photographs, taken April 5, 2014. They are gray and roundish, but are quickly turning red like their parents. Last year when I saw young foxes in early May, they already looked like smaller versions of the adults.

The foxes are very active in this rural neighborhood, and my friend Pat has seen all sorts of behavior, including adults carrying prey, burying it in leaves and then retrieving it; carrying tiny kits in their mouths; nursing the kits; and grooming behavior. Earlier, one of the adult foxes spent about two hours screaming as he ran around the area, possibly as a way to announce his territory. The screaming was so loud that neighbors called out of concern that something terrible was happening, Pat said.
About Foxes.

Click on a photograph to see a full-size version and begin a slideshow with descriptions.

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Filed under Animals, Kansas, Kansas City

Don’t Be a Silly Goose! Fly South for the Winter!

Whose idea was it to spend winter here?

Recently, I was walking Loki, the family dog, when I saw a flock of Canada Geese (a gaggle ?) on a frozen pond in my Kansas City area neighborhood. It was a beautiful sight. The low afternoon sun cast a golden glow onto the melting water, reflecting the geese and the yellow foliage of grass and cat tails. If you didn’t look too closely, you wouldn’t see the goose poop scattered artistically across the frozen surface. I took the dog home and returned with my camera. The geese don’t like paparazzi, so they headed to the opposite side of the pond.

These geese like the neighborhood.  After a heavy snow, I saw the geese gathered on a golf course, taking advantage of a lack of golfers.

About Canada Geese.

This golf gallery is a gaggle of geese gawking on a golf green (now white with snow.)

This golf gallery is a gaggle of geese gawking on a golf green (now white with snow.)

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Filed under Animals, Biology, Bird-watching, Birds, Humor, Kansas City, Natural History, Photography

Massive Fire Near Yosemite National Park

A giant sequoia towers above visitors to Tuolumne Grove in Yosemite National Park. Tuolumne is one of three named sequoia groves in Yosemite.

A giant sequoia towers above visitors to Tuolumne Grove in Yosemite National Park. Tuolumne is one of three named sequoia groves in Yosemite.

A year ago (September 2012) my husband and I visited Yosemite National Park, a magnificent place.  Here are some photos from the Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias, which is near the Rim Fire, California’s fourth largest fire since 1932. It’s burning an area more than seven times larger than San Francisco (about 368 square miles), according to an NBC story. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection reported that the Rim Fire was 75% contained Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013.

The Yosemite park staff posted this on its Facebook page: Giant sequoias are resistant to, and thrive on, frequent small fires that naturally burned every several years. In order to protect the giant sequoias from the extremely intense Rim Fire, crews performed some protective work in the Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias just over a week ago (as you can see in this video). Since then, firing operations in the area have provided additional protection. So, while fire maps show the Tuolumne Grove within the fire perimeter, the giant sequoias are safe. 

You can see the video by clicking on Post by Yosemite National Park.

Yosemite National Park Facebook Page

Why a Century of Fire Prevention Means Trouble for Yosemite’s Giant Sequoias

Click on any thumbnail to see a much larger size in a slide show, including Tuolumne Signs in a readable size.

Yosemite National Park video.

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Filed under Conservation, Natural History, Photography, Travel

Moose in Colorado

This moose stared back when I was taking its photo in Colorado.

This moose stared back when I was taking its photo in Colorado.

Swedish photographer Björn Törngren posted some photographs of moose in Sweden on his blog, which reminded me that I hadn’t posted my moose photographs from a trip to Colorado in 2012.

When my husband and I visited the Brainard Lake Recreation Area last year, we were surprised to see moose in Colorado.

Moose are relatively new to Colorado.  According to the National Park Service, historical records dating back to the 1850s show that moose were probably only transient visitors to the area that is now Rocky Mountain National Park.  In 1978 and 1979, the Colorado Division of Wildlife transferred two groups of moose (a dozen each year) from the Uintah Mountains and Grand Teton herds to an area just west of the Never Summer Range near Rand, Colorado.  The moose have prospered in Colorado.  There are now more than 2,300.

All of the moose we saw had antlers, so they were all males.

Wildlife enthusiasts set up to photograph a herd of moose at the Brainard Lake Recreation Area in Colorado.

Wildlife enthusiasts set up to photograph a herd of moose at the Brainard Lake Recreation Area in Colorado.

A boy keeps a fairly safe distance from moose grazing near Brainard Lake in Colorado.  Moose are dangerous and unpredictable and often charge.

A boy keeps a fairly safe distance from moose grazing near Brainard Lake in Colorado. Moose are dangerous and unpredictable and often charge.

This is one of my better shots.  The moose were far away and were eating most of the time in tall vegetation.

This is one of my better shots. The moose were far away and were eating most of the time in tall vegetation.

A herd of moose line up to graze in a marshy area at Brainard Lake Recreation Area in Colorado.

A herd of moose line up to graze in a marshy area at Brainard Lake Recreation Area in Colorado.

Herd of moose graze near Brainard Lake in Colorado.

Herd of moose graze near Brainard Lake in Colorado.

National Park Service Information on Moose in Colorado.

Story about moose in Colorado.

Wikipedia: About the Moose.

Drunken moose ends up stuck in Swedish apple tree.

Click on the thumbnails to view a full-size slide show.

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Filed under Animals, Natural History, Nature, Photography

Welcome to My Caterpillar Ranch

I found this Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar crawling in the middle of my lawn and gave it a ride to this fennel plant, where it attached itself with a sling to a fennel stalk.  Some time during the night it shrugged off its skin and became a chrysalis.

I found this Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar crawling in the middle of my lawn and gave it a ride to this fennel plant, where it attached itself with a sling to a fennel stalk. Some time during the night it shrugged off its skin and became a chrysalis.

I used to freak out when I saw a caterpillar on one of my plants. Now, I’m disappointed when I don’t see them. And now how do I feel when I see them? So happy!

Here is a Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar feeding on a dill plant.  The day after I photographed this caterpillar on the dill, it disappeared. I thought it had either died or crawled away to pupate. Then, I found it (I think) crawling in the middle of my lawn, far from any twig to attach itself to.  I gave it a lift on a stick to one of my fennel plants in case it needed a little more food.   The next day I saw it had attached itself to a twig and the day after that it was a chrysalis.

Here is a Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar feeding on a dill plant. The day after I photographed this caterpillar on the dill, it disappeared. I thought it had either died or crawled away to pupate. Then, I found it (I think it was the same one) crawling in the middle of my lawn, far from any twig to attach itself to. I gave it a lift on a stick to one of my fennel plants in case it needed a little more food. The next day I saw it had attached itself to a twig and the day after that it was a chrysalis.

Many of the plants in my garden are members of the carrot family, which are the food source of Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillars. I’ve planted bronze fennel, parsley and dill, plus there’s wild Queen Anne’s Lace nearby. So far, the BST butterflies have only laid eggs on the fennel, so I was happily surprised when I found a large caterpillar on a dill plant, which is fifty feet from the rest of my butterfly garden.

The next day the caterpillar was gone, another casualty or was it pupating somewhere? Then I found a caterpillar struggling to crawl in the grass in the middle of my lawn. Where was he going? If he was from the dill plant, he’d already crawled more than 50 feet. I gave him a lift on a stick and stuck him on a fennel plant.  Then he pupated there.

I'm giving a Black Swallowtail Butterfly Caterpillar a ride on a stick.  I found him in the grass in my lawn far from anywhere to pupate.  Although BST caterpillars can travel a long way, I was afraid he'd be stepped on.

I’m giving a Black Swallowtail Butterfly Caterpillar a ride on a stick. I found him in the grass in my lawn far from anywhere to pupate. Although BST caterpillars can travel a long way, I was afraid he’d be stepped on.

About the Black Swallowtail Butterfly.

What do Black Swallowtail Caterpillars eat?

I'm amazed that I saw this Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar crawling through my lawn.  If he was from my dill plant, he'd already traveled more than 50 feet.

I’m amazed that I saw this Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar crawling through my lawn. If he was from my dill plant, he’d already traveled more than 50 feet

This is one of the few times I've seen this orange gland on an annoyed Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar.  Usually, the caterpillars are fairly easy-going and don't mind me puttering around.  The black swallowtail caterpillar has an orange "forked gland", called the osmeterium. When in danger, the osmeterium, which looks like a snake's tongue, appears and releases a foul smell to repel predators. I didn't smell anything, so I'm lucky.

This is one of the few times I’ve seen this orange gland on an annoyed Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar. Usually, the caterpillars are fairly easy-going and don’t mind me puttering around. The black swallowtail caterpillar has an orange “forked gland”, called the osmeterium. When in danger, the osmeterium, which looks like a snake’s tongue, appears and releases a foul smell to repel predators. I didn’t smell anything, so I’m lucky.

Here's a Black Swallowtail Butterfly egg on the left.  To the right you can see a spider in its web.

Here’s a Black Swallowtail Butterfly egg on the left. To the right you can see a spider in its web. Butterflies have many predators at all stages in their development.

A Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar rests after a day of eating fennel. It's amazing that a caterpillar can survive and thrive on only one plant.  The orange blobs in the background are cosmos flowers, which the adult butterflies get nectar from.

A Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar rests after a day of eating fennel. It’s amazing that a caterpillar can survive and thrive on only one plant. The orange blobs in the background are cosmos flowers, which the adult butterflies get nectar from.

Here's one of the early instars (or stages) of a Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillars. Below you can see a tiny spider in its web.

Here’s one of the early instars (or stages) of a Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillars. Below you can see a tiny spider in its web.

I placed the Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar on this fennel plant after I found him in the middle of my yard.  He seemed exhausted from his travels.

I placed the Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillar on this fennel plant after I found him in the middle of my yard. He seemed exhausted from his travels.

Below is a beautiful adult Black Swallowtail Butterfly, which I photographed on a coneflower in my garden. In addition to host plants for caterpillars, you also need many nectar flowering plants to attract and feed the adults. Bonus: Nectar flower plants are also beautiful!  From Monarch Watch: Tips on how to start a Butterfly Garden.

Click on any photo thumbnail below to see it full-size and in a slide show.

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Filed under Butterflies, Gardening, Insects, Nature, Photography

Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas

A view of the sunset from Cameron Bluff Overlook in Mount Magazine State park in Arkansas.

Visiting the Cameron Bluff Overlook at sunset in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas is a great way to end a day.

Sometimes we take our neighbors for granted.   The state line of Arkansas is about four hours from my house, but I’ve visited that state just twice until this May when my husband and I and some friends went to Mount Magazine State Park.

I shouldn’t have waited so long!  It’s gorgeous.  Mount Magazine  is the highest point in the Arkansas with sweeping views of river valleys.  The weather was volatile while we were there with lots of fast-moving clouds, some thunderstorms and tornadoes to the south and west. The park’s Lodge overlooks the Petit Jean River Valley and Blue Mountain Lake.  From the balcony in our room, we could see the clouds sweeping past, and during a storm, lightning flashed in the clouds almost at eye level. I’ll let my photographs do the rest of the talking. I’ll also be posting about a day trip to Little Rock, where we visited the William J. Clinton Presidential Center and the Arkansas state capitol building, and also a post on Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville.

You can find great photographs, trail maps, wildlife and plants facts, lists of activities, lodging and camping details and other information at the Mount Magazine State Park Website Wildlife viewing is great in the park.  Many brochures with wildlife checklists and other information are available at the Lodge and at the park’s visitor center.

About the Arkansas State Butterfly — the Diana Fritillary.

About the Arkansas State Mammal — the Whitetail Deer.

From top left, clockwise are a chipmunk, white-tailed deer, zebra butterfly, Diana Fritillary Butterfly and the ruby-throated hummingbird.  I photographed these animals in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas in late May 2013.  The White-tailed  deer, the Arkansas state mammal, is feasting on a white oak leaf.  The Diana Fritillary Buttery is Arkansas' state butterfly.  This poor butterfly is very tattered, as is the Zebra butterfly, which is the state butterfly of Tennessee. It's a hard, hard life for butterflies.

From top left, clockwise are a chipmunk, white-tailed deer, zebra butterfly, Diana Fritillary Butterfly and the ruby-throated hummingbird. I photographed these animals in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas in late May 2013. The White-tailed deer, the Arkansas state mammal, is feasting on a white oak leaf. The Diana Fritillary Butterfly is the Arkansas’ state butterfly. This poor butterfly is very tattered, as is the Zebra butterfly, which is the state butterfly of Tennessee. It’s a hard, hard life for butterflies.

Here's a view from Bear Hollow Trail in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas.

Here’s a view from Bear Hollow Trail in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas.

Pink roses grow among the rocks along Bear Hollow Trail in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas.

Pink roses grow among the rocks along Bear Hollow Trail in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas.

These sassafras trees in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas are some of the tallest in the state.

These sassafras trees in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas are some of the tallest in the state.

This young sassafras tree stands beneath some of the tallest sassafras trees in Arkansas.  Sassafras extract from the roots was a primary ingredient in root beer.

This young sassafras tree stands beneath some of the tallest sassafras trees in Arkansas. Sassafras extract from the roots was a primary ingredient in root beer.

A model of Mount Magazine is on display in the Lodge.

A model of Mount Magazine is on display in the Lodge.

Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas truly is an island in the sky.

Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas truly is an island in the sky.

A section of the Lodge in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas.

A section of the Lodge in Mount Magazine State Park in Arkansas.

We climbed to Signal Hill on Mount Magazine, the highest point in Arkansas.  It's surrounded by trees so there aren't any panoramic views from this spot.

We climbed to Signal Hill on Mount Magazine, the highest point in Arkansas. It’s surrounded by trees so there aren’t any panoramic views from this spot.

 This survey marker plaque on Signal Hill of Mount Magazine from the U.S. Department of Interior indicates the highest point in Arkansas (2,753 feet above sea level) and sits in a 400 square feet stone map of Arkansas.  The stone map was built to a scale of one foot equals 13 miles.  On the stone map, the survey marker is positioned on the location of Mount Magazine.

This survey marker plaque on Signal Hill of Mount Magazine from the U.S. Department of Interior indicates the highest point in Arkansas (2,753 feet above sea level) and sits in a 400 square feet stone map of Arkansas. The stone map was built to a scale of one foot equals 13 miles. On the stone map, the survey marker is positioned on the location of Mount Magazine.

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker birds made hundreds of holes in this sugar maple tree.  Sap oozes from the holes, attracting insects, which the sap-suckers eat. Very clever!  Settlers harvested sap from these trees to make maple syrup.  Forty gallons of sugar maple sap is needed to produce one gallon of syrup.

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker birds made hundreds of holes in this sugar maple tree. Sap oozes from the holes, attracting insects, which the sap-suckers eat. Very clever! Settlers harvested sap from these trees to make maple syrup. Forty gallons of sugar maple sap is needed to produce one gallon of syrup.

There are many beautiful hiking trails on Mount magazine.

There are many beautiful hiking trails on Mount Magazine.

The dining room in the Lodge at Mount Magazine is beautiful with beautiful views.

The dining room in the Lodge at Mount Magazine is beautiful with beautiful views.

Here’s a video with many views of the Lodge at Mount Magazine.

Click on any thumbnail photo to see a full-size version in a new window.

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Filed under Photography, Travel

Birds on a Snowy Day

 Whenever it snows, birds of all kinds flock to our bird feeder.  Most of the birds wait on the nearby trees for a spot on the feeder. Our two cats love the snow, because it's excellent bird-watching.  They seem to know that there's no chance of catching any birds, but they are vigilant anyway.

Whenever it snows, birds of all kinds flock to our bird feeder. Most of the birds wait on the nearby trees for a spot on the feeder. Our two cats love the snow, because it’s excellent bird-watching. They seem to know that there’s no chance of catching any birds, but they are vigilant anyway.

I hate snow, but our cats love it.  It’s great for bird watching.  We got about a foot of snow today in the Kansas City area, and the forecast calls for more.  The crowds at the bird feeder were huge today. I saw five pairs of cardinals, black-capped chickadees, blue jays, doves, nuthatches, a red-bellied woodpeckers and some birds I didn’t recognize. Click on the photos for a better view.

When the snow was falling hard, birds mobbed the feeder and filled the nearby trees as they waited their turn.  When the snow stopped, the traffic thinned out.  In the bottom photo, a cardinal leisurely eats his meal.

When the snow was falling hard, birds mobbed the feeder and filled the nearby trees as they waited their turn. When the snow stopped, the traffic thinned out. In the bottom photo, a cardinal leisurely eats his meal.

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Filed under Animals, Bird-watching, Birds, Photography