George Orwell Revisited

                                                                                                                                                                              Last week, I wrote about George Orwell’s new blog. Now he’s back in the news as a subject in a book he shares with Evelyn Waugh.  At first glance, Orwell and Waugh couldn’t be more different in style, interests and beliefs, but writer David Lebedoff has tied together these two fascinating British authors.  You can click on a link below for more information on the book The Same Man: George Orwell and Evelyn Waugh in Love and War.

Orwell and Waugh lived at the same time, observed a similar world and country and expressed opinions on the same topics.  Orwell is known for his dark views of a downtrodden futuristic society, while Waugh’s literary world was lush and populated with an aristocratic crowd. 

The book that epitomizes Waugh for me is Brideshead Revisited.  OK, I admit it was the 1982 miniseries, featuring a young Jeremy Irons, that first drew my attention to Waugh.  Recently, a shorter version of Brideshead Revisited made it to the theater screen.  I don’t see how it can top the first one, but I know I’ll see it eventually.  I’m a sucker for any period piece, even if it takes place last year.

If you want some reviews about the new Orwell/Waugh book go to my book club blog.

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4 Comments

Filed under Entertainment, History, Humor, Language, Life, Literature, Movies, Personal, Politics, Random, Writing

4 responses to “George Orwell Revisited

  1. Orwellophile – Someone who is fascinated by the vision of George Orwell’s dystopia.

  2. So much to absorb here as well as dashing between blogs!

  3. Catherine Sherman

    Paula, Sorry about the whiplash between blogs!

  4. Saul

    Interesting stuff, but…”Brideshead Revisited” is the exception when it comes to Waugh’s output: the only time he allowed himself to “drown in honey, stingless”. The book is a superabundant antidote, surfeited on on a sacharine prose style [sugar was rationed at the time], to the dreariness of ’40s England and he never repeated the experiment.

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