Cycling in Denmark

Bicyclists are everywhere in Copenhagen, and they are very skilled at maneuvering in traffic.  Here, two young lovers hold hands as they speed down the street.

Bicyclists are everywhere in Copenhagen, and they are very skilled at maneuvering in traffic. Here, two young lovers hold hands as they speed down the street.

One of the first things my husband and I noticed in Copenhagen was that it’s a city on two wheels. The city is flat, has many bike lanes, a lot of narrow streets, limited parking in the city and everything costs a lot — at least for Americans. So bikes make a lot of economic sense. Almost 40 percent of the city’s inhabitants commute on bicycles.

A crowd of bicyclists peddle rapidly at rush hour on H.C. Andersens Boulevard at the Town Hall Square in Copenhagen, Denmark.

A crowd of bicyclists peddle rapidly at rush hour on H.C. Andersens Boulevard at the Town Hall Square in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Almost everyone on the bikes looked fit and attractive.  It was like being a Ralph Lauren ad without the pretentiousness. Copenhagen is considered the most bike-friendly city in the world. More people commute on bicycles in Copenhagen than in all of the much, much larger United States. Pedestrians need to be aware, because they will easily be knocked down at rush hour. There also were a lot of bikes in Aarhus, Denmark’s second largest city, which is also a college town.

A mother and her son bike to the store together in Copenhagen, Denmark.

A mother and her son bike to the store together in Copenhagen, Denmark.

A father and son ride a tandem bicycle in Copenhagen, Denmark.

A father and son ride a tandem bicycle in Copenhagen, Denmark.

A pedicab enters an historic prison area at Slutterigade in Copenhagen.

A pedicab enters an historic prison area at Slutterigade in Copenhagen.

A biker crosses the courtyard of Amalienborg Palace, the winter residence of the Danish royal family.  The equestrian statue is of Amalienborg's founder, King Frederick V.

A biker crosses the courtyard of Amalienborg Palace, the winter residence of the Danish royal family. The equestrian statue depicts Amalienborg’s founder, King Frederick V.

Højbro Plads (Hojbro Square) is a popular spot for tourists and locals. On this July day, there were so many parked bicycles that there was hardly room for people.  Højbro  is public square located between the adjoining Amagertorv and Slotsholmen Canal in the City Center of Copenhagen, Denmark. According to Wikipedia, It takes its name from the Højbro Bridge which connects it to the Slotsholmen island on the other side of the canal while Gammel Strand extends along the near side of the canal.  The most striking feature of the square is an equestrian statue of Absalon, the warrior-bishop who has traditionally been credited as the founder of Copenhagen. It was inaugurated in 1901 to commemorate the septcentennial of his death.

Højbro Plads (Hojbro Square) is a popular spot for tourist and locals. On this July day, there were so many parked bicycles that there’s hardly room for people. Højbro is public square located between the adjoining Amagertorv and Slotsholmen Canal in the City Center of Copenhagen, Denmark. According to Wikipedia, It takes its name from the Højbro Bridge which connects it to the Slotsholmen island on the other side of the canal while Gammel Strand extends along the near side of the canal. The most striking feature of the square is an equestrian statue of Absalon, the warrior-bishop who has traditionally been credited as the founder of Copenhagen. It was inaugurated in 1901 to commemorate the septcentennial of his death.

 

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How Denmark Became a Cycling Nation.

Wikipedia: Cycling in Copenhagen

Wikipedia: About Denmark.

The Official Website of Denmark.

The Danish Royal Couple on Bikes (Horses, Yacht…)

The Danish People are the Happiest People on Earth.

 

 

Some of my Postcards of Bicycles in Copenhagen:

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17 Comments

Filed under Life, Photography, Royalty, Travel

17 responses to “Cycling in Denmark

  1. I love it! good for the environment and such a wonderful way to travel without all the noise from bustling cars. 🙂

  2. Lynn

    We should do more of this. Thanks for sharing this info and posting all your fun photos.

  3. For those who live in a city like Madrid envy f this wonderful city of Copenhagen moving by bike. Thank you very much for this reporting that brings me beautiful memories.

  4. Love your photos, esp. the bike collection. 😉

  5. Reblogged this on Shouts from the Abyss and commented:
    Great post and photography about bicycling in Denmark.

  6. Cycling and re-cycling….bring your bike lock!!!

  7. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    A LIFE CYCLE….WORTH THE INVESTIGATING!

  8. What springs to mind, Catherine, are the health benefits of this lifestyle. Though, it seems from the images, it’s a lifestyle for the young. I’m wondering about the more advanced in age. Do they not engage in this lifestyle? Are they, perhaps, not catered to/for? It’s opened up a whole vista of questions for me. I’ll have to do some investigation.

    • I did notice that most of the bicyclists looked under the age of forty, and although exercise does keep you young-looking, it doesn’t keep you looking that young. Maybe the older people take the metro, which I didn’t investigate. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_Metro

      Thanks for stopping by and for your comment.

      • Fascinating stats, Catherine. I imagine it’s like most modern cities – more of the younger population inhabit the inner city, whilst the older/maturing people gravitate to the slower lifestyle further out. At least, that’s the way of things here in Australia.
        My love of music had me singing ‘Wonderful, Wonderful Copenhagen’ whilst here. So much history, and such a modern city all rolled into one.

  9. Great post Catherine! And I love your postcards of the bikes. I’m so glad you posted this because we’re heading to Copenhagen in the Fall. James and I bike here at home all the time, but we live on a small island. James is a pro, but I may not be ready for prime time. 🙂 Did you and your husband bike in Copenhagen? ~Terri

    • I’m looking forward to your report from Copenhagen. My husband and I didn’t bike. We walked and we stayed out of the bike paths as much as possible. We haven’t biked in a long time, so we’d definitely need a cycling tune-up. It’s like the Tour de France on the streets! They go fast, and we were warned that they don’t stop for wayward pedestrians.

  10. Hi C,
    My human says it brings back memories. He used to get to the Scandinavian countries 3 – 4 times a year. He had a friend who worked for SAS who claimed he had a bicycle that had a mermaid’s figure built into the handle bars and the bike’s front end. He loved Copenhagen and Oslo.
    Sandy

  11. Fantastic set of photos! I like it. 🙂 K.

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